Archive

Archive for 2013

Network troubleshooting in distributed Wi-Fi environments

November 20th, 2013

Wi-Fi is installed after everything else in the network is already set up – switches, routers, servers, firewalls, VPNs etc. Naturally, customers rely on their Wi-Fi solution provider to alleviate any network problems that arise during the Wi-Fi deployments, even though the problems are not necessarily Wi-Fi specific.

Need Wi-Fi troubleshooting? Call up a networking Jedi!

Need Wi-Fi troubleshooting? Call up a networking Jedi!

Network issues aren’t something new in any project. However, the troubleshooting task becomes challenging when it needs to be done remotely and when there isn’t much onsite IT help. This is often the case with the distributed Wi-Fi deployments. Also, due to the heterogeneity of the network infrastructure in many environments in the distributed vertical, sometimes very stealthy network problems are encountered. Take these recent troubleshooting examples which underscore these points.

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WLAN Troubleshooting

Get in the Game with Wi-Fi Managed Services, Part 2

November 14th, 2013

This is part 2 of the 2-part series on the managed service provider model in Wi-Fi. Click here for part 1.

Is Wi-Fi Ready for MSPs?

An important consideration when offering Wi-Fi as a managed service is whether or not the Wi-Fi solution you will choose is designed for it, both from the technical and business aspects. There’s far more to the selection process than meets the eye, and a few (of many) requirements might include:

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Managed Service

Get in the Game with Wi-Fi Managed Services

November 12th, 2013

This is part 1 on our two-part MSP series. Part 1 focuses on the basics of the MSP delivery, while part 2 will discuss how to make this model work for you.

Nothing’s much has changed since I last blogged about Wi-Fi managed services almost a year ago, other than that I now work for a different manufacturer. The reason for the longer-than-expected ramp-up time is that Wi-Fi manufacturers (in general) haven’t yet adequately equipped their channel partners to take advantage of this market trend. The slow ramp-up is over, and it looks like it’s a land grab of epic proportion… starting… NOW.  For those of you waiting on the sidelines, it’s time to get in the game.

Market Drivers for MSPs

msp-datacenterAs the challenges of delivering high-performance wireless access networks in the face of exploding user demands become ever more daunting to the average IT guy, midmarket CIOs are still having a difficult time of adequately staffing their IT organization. Gartner and I both still believe that midmarket companies should consider using Managed Service Providers (MSPs) to solve this problem.

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Managed Service

Wi-Fi Speeds-n-Feeds Are So Old-school

October 30th, 2013

Speed-n-feeds are not the future of enterprise Wi-Fi. Speed-n-feeds are like my grandmother’s potatoes. I’ll explain.

Ricotta-orange-sweet-potato-cakes

Speed is a given. Speed is a commodity. This is what you talk about when you have nothing else to offer, such as system intelligence. Some companies keep trying to rehash the speeds-n-feeds story like my grandmother used to treat potatoes. First, you’d have baked potatoes. If you didn’t eat all of them, the next night, you’d have mashed potatoes – made from those same potatoes, of course. If there happened to be any left-overs after that, you’d have fried potato cakes the next night. Believe me, the list of how those potatoes could be served was endless until those potatoes were gone. Same potatoes, different day.

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Midmarket

Bang for the buck with explicit beam forming in 802.11ac

October 16th, 2013

 

Bang for the buck with explicit beam forming in 802.11ac

802.11ac has brought with it MIMO alphabet soup … spatial streams, space-time streams, explicit beam forming, CSD, MU-MIMO. Alphabet soup triggers questions to which curious mind seeks answers. This post is an attempt to explore some questions surrounding explicit beam forming (E-BF) that is available in Wave-1 of 802.11ac. E-BF is a mechanism to manipulate transmissions on multiple antennas to facilitate SNR boosting at the target client.

How is E-BF related to spatial streams?

E-BF is a technique different from spatial streams. E-BF can be used whenever there are multiple antennas on the transmitter, irrespective of the number of spatial streams used for transmission.

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802.11ac , , ,

Hunting down the cost factors in the cloud Wi-Fi management plane

October 3rd, 2013

 

Mature cloud Wi-Fi offerings have gone through few phases already. They started with bare-bones device configuration from the cloud console and over the years matured into meaty management plane for complete Wi-Fi access, security and complementary services in the cloud.

CostAlongside these phases of evolution, optimizing the cost of operation of the cloud backend has always been important consideration. It is critical for cloud operators and Managed Service Providers (MSPs). This cost dictates what end users pay for cloud Wi-Fi services and whether attractive pricing models (like AirTight’s Opex-only model) can be viable in the long run. It is also important to the bottom line of the cloud operator/MSP.

Posed with the cost question, one would impulsively say that cost is driven by the capacity in terms of number of APs that can be managed from a staple of compute resource in the cloud. That is an important cost contributor, but not the only one!

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Cloud computing , , , , , ,

MU-MIMO: How may the path look like from standardization to implementation?

September 26th, 2013

In earlier blog posts on 802.11ac practical considerations, we reviewed 80 MHz channels, 256 QAM and 5 GHz migration. Continuing the 802.11ac insights series, in this post we will look at some practical aspects of MU-MIMO, which is the star attraction of the impending Wave-2 of 802.11ac.

 

MU-MIMO mechanics and 802.11ac standard

 

Illustration of 802.11ac MU-MIMO

Illustration of 802.11ac MU-MIMO

At a high level, MU-MIMO allows AP with multiple antennas to concurrently transmit frames to multiple clients, when each of the multiple clients has lesser antennas than AP. For example, AP with 4 antennas can use 2-stream transmission to a client which has 2 antennas and 1-stream transmission to a client which has 1 antenna, simultaneously. Implicit requirement to attain such concurrent transmission is beamforming, which has to ensure that bits of the first client coherently combine at its location, while bits of the second client do the same at the second client location. It is also important to ensure that bits of the first client form null beam at the location of the second client and vice versa.

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802.11ac , ,

Blackhat Wi-Fi Security Reports and Nuances of Detection Methods

September 12th, 2013

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blackhat USA 13Shortly following the conclusion of Blackhat’13, a few articles came out reporting wireless scanning data from the venue.

  Inside the Black Hat 2013 Wi-Fi Network

  Karma is a …Errr, What We Learned at BlackHat 2013 

 

Both reports state that many security relevant events were detected in the Wi-Fi traffic during the conference. Given that Blackhat is attended by security experts, ethical hackers and just plain security geeks, finding security signatures in the traffic is not uncommon. Nonetheless, I think a few things still need to be matched up in these stats before arriving at sound conclusions.

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Wireless security , , , , , , ,

Get Soaked in the Future of Wi-Fi

September 5th, 2013

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AirTight Networks is armed with Wi-Fi of the future, and blasting the message out through social media.

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Have you ever noticed that there always seems to be a disconnect in the Wi-Fi industry whereby vendors build and sell their products based on hardware capabilities, tech specs, and geeky feature sets while customers ultimately evaluate products based on how the solution fits with their organizational objectives? That’s a problem.

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The Wi-Fi market is on the cusp of a second-wind of tremendous growth that will be driven by focusing product solutions on the tailored needs of customers in every vertical market.  However, this is a departure from the status-quo as historically the Wi-Fi market has grown by pushing products (not solutions) based on the latest hardware enhancements and improvements in speed that have come with each iteration of the 802.11 standard. But that model is breaking down as the technology matures, and hardware differentiation alone is very minimal. And customers are demanding more tailored solutions as their own markets evolve into a mobile-enabled workforce and customer experience.

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WLAN networks ,

11 Commandments of Wi-Fi Decision Making

September 4th, 2013

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Are you considering new Wi-Fi deployment or upgrade of legacy system? Then you should be prepared to navigate the maze of multiple decision factors given that Wi-Fi bake-offs increasingly require multi-faceted evaluation.

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Follow these 11 “C”ommandments to navigate the Wi-Fi decision tree:

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  1. Cost

  2. Wi-Fi CommandmentsComplexity

  3. Coverage

  4. Capacity

  5. Capabilities

  6. Channels

  7. Clients

  8. Cloud

  9. Controller

  10. 11aC, and last but not least …

  11. seCurity!

 

|hemant C tweet

 

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802.11ac, Best practices, WLAN planning , , , , ,