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Posts Tagged ‘BYOD’

1 Minute Survey: BYOD – Love it/Hate it?

March 16th, 2012

Take the BYOD survey and enter to win an 8GB iPod Touch.

The BYOD trend is causing new security concerns for enterprise network and data security. Corporate users (e.g. employees, contractors) are accessing enterprise network and data, and bypassing corporate security controls using their personal Wi-Fi devices. This uncontrolled access can open wireless backdoors into the enterprise network, malicious activity, leakage of sensitive data, and exposure to malware.

Click the link to take the BYOD survey and enter to win an 8GB iPod Touch.

https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/ATNBYODsurvey2012

 

Phones are increasingly becoming portals to the outside world, with their own networks that can bridge WiFi security and provide an unauthorized laptop access. AirTight would like a minute of your time to understand how pervasive these devices are in your organization and if they have affected the way you address network security.

As a thank you for helping AirTight with this short survey, two names will be drawn at random to win an 8GB iPod Touch. To be entered in the drawing please submit your contact information at the end of this survey.

BYOD, Wireless security , , , , ,

Don’t let BYOD turn into “BYOR” in your network

February 27th, 2012

BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) seems to be the dominant theme for 2012 in the Wi-Fi infrastructure and security space. As people increasingly bring in personal smartphone devices on the enterprise premises, the network/security administrators are grappling with the security implications. Given how engaging the new smartphone and tablet apps are, conflict arises between the users’ desire and the network/security administrators’ intentions. You need to ensure that this conflict does not turn BYOD into BYOR (Bring Your Own Rogue AP)! Read more…

802.11n, Best practices, Compliance, smartphones, Wireless gadgets, Wireless security , , , ,

BYOD and WPA2 – not made for each other

February 21st, 2012

BYOD and WPA2: Not Made for Each Other!As the BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) tide rises, the  network and security admins wonder if their existing Wi-Fi infrastructure security will hold on. In particular, will WPA2 with PEAP, which is pretty much the norm for the Wi-Fi infrastructure security in the enterprise networks today, continue to be adequate? WPA2 with PEAP is simple enough, still strong enough, and has served the enterprise Wi-Fi security needs very well in the past several years. The forthcoming BYOD revolution however pops a new challenge for WPA2 and will require additional thinking on part of the network and security admins about how to complement PEAP to address some of the BYOD security issue. This new challenge comes from the ease with which people can bring in personal mobile devices on the enterprise premises and connect them to the WPA2 enterprise Wi-Fi network without administrator knowledge or help.

Read more…

Wireless security , , , , , , , ,

A tale of the two WLAN controllers, do we need to be chasing our tail for the WLAN security?

January 31st, 2012

Right when the Wi-Fi access and security management are moving towards the controller-less architecture, another interesting architecture seems to have evolved at the other extreme. This architecture seems to be advocating not one, but two WLAN controllers in tandem – and that too from two different vendors. And, some optional (additional?) security management servers on top of the tandem. You think I am kidding? Then check this announcement from Aruba Networks, which is a leading controller-based WLAN vendor: http://www.arubanetworks.com/solutions/by-application/byod-services-on-your-existing-wi-fi/. The stated business case seems to be to put a band-aid on the Cisco WLAN’s (another leading controller-based WLAN vendor) insufficient security features.

In this case, the tandem is only for BYOD security, but as a matter of fact there are many more security gaps that will still remain to be addressed even after the twin tandem controllers are deployed. Would we need a third WLAN controller in the tandem to fill the remaining security gap, and who might provide that? Or, is it just easier to deploy a controller-less comprehensive WIPS solution (and that too with the onsite or cloud option) and secure the Cisco WLAN once and for all. Just a practical thought.

Cloud computing, Wireless security , , , , ,