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Posts Tagged ‘HIMSS’

HIMSS 2014 – Big on Wireless

March 6th, 2014

This year’s show was huge. According to the events organizers, there were 1,200 exhibitors and 38,000 healthcare professionals in attendance and there were more nurses, physicians, IT staff and executives in attendance at this year’s HIMSS than ever before.

Connecting Right People to the Right Information in the Right Time

Some of the main areas of focus this year were patient safety, care quality, patient engagement, access to quality care and affordability, but the overarching main theme of the show seemed to be along the lines of enabling the right people to get access to the right information at the right time.

Of special note was the Interoperability Showcase with its one acre of space. This is where over 100 diverse systems demonstrated interoperability for typical patient workflows under different healthcare settings. One of the main objectives of the Interoperability Showcase is to improve overall patient care. This area of the show garnered a lot of attention and interest, and it is understandable that it would as ultimately the quality of care delivered is very much contingent of how well all of the various devices and applications work together. Hopefully the Interop Showcase will be part of future HIMSS conferences.

New Wi-Fi enabled devices and applications at HIMSS14

Wi-Fi helps disabled people walk

Wi-Fi helps disabled people walk

One of the most interesting Wi-Fi capable devices at this year’s HIMSS was a Wi-Fi enabled bionic exoskeleton. The Ekso Bionics unit (pictured above) was featured in the Lockheed Martin booth. This device is for patients with lower extremity paralysis or weakness. It enables patients to stand, walk and it can assist them with their rehabilitation. The unit is equipped with a single Wi-Fi radio. The radio supports two data streams currently. One stream allows engineers to see real-time telemetry data to determine how the unit is performing. The other stream is for the unit’s user, where information such as steps taken, distance traveled, etc., are sent over the air to an application that the user can access later.

WLAN: a necessity in today’s healthcare delivery

HIMSS14 saw all of the enterprise class WLAN equipment manufactures in attendance. And while there have not been any major publicized security breaches in healthcare lately like there have been in retail, Wi-Fi equipment companies were talking about security and protecting patient records again at this year’s show. Enabling BYOD is still front and center. Doctors and other care providers apparently really like using their tablets… So onboarding and mobile device management (MDM) solutions were the topics of many conversions between WLAN equipment manufactures and HIMSS14 attendees.

Another topic of discussion at WLAN booths was real-time location systems (RTLS) enhancements. A couple of WLAN solution providers were discussing 11ac’s impact on high definition video conferencing and moving large diagnostic images around via Wi-Fi. Another popular topic was high availability and uninterrupted care.

Were HIMSS attendees excited about catching 11ac Wave 1?

A number of IT executives in attendance stated that they are looking forward to 11ac solving density and capacity challenges; however, they will likely need to be a bit patient as there were more execs looking forward to 11ac than there were 11ac capable client devices at the show.

While there may have been 11ac capable devices at the show there were not easy to find. Checking in with manufacturers of all types of Wi-Fi enabled medical and communication devices, such as makers of infusion pumps, patient monitoring devices, RTLS systems, voice handsets and video conferencing systems, etc. did not uncover a single 11ac capable device. One vendor of workstations on wheels (WOW), equipped with a high definition video conferencing system, stated that they are in the process of retrofitting their WOW systems with 11ac radios. Their stated main reason for doing so is for scalability as they have discovered that HD video conferencing can easily overwhelm 11n, even at relatively low client densities. (But that is a subject for another blog…)

For more healthcare topics, please see our earlier posts:

802.11ac, Healthcare, WiFi Access ,

Distributed Healthcare Needs Wi-Fi That Works at Scale

February 18th, 2014

The growth and adoption of mobile technologies is impacting businesses in multiple industries, and we can see strong evidence of this by looking at the healthcare industry. I just returned from the WLAN Professionals Conference in Austin, TX where I heard first-hand evidence of this in a presentation on Continuous Wireless for Medical Devices. A strong emphasis was placed on improving patient safety through the use of mobile technologies that enabled doctors, nurses, and assistants to effectively handle their ever-increasing workload.

A reliable, stable, cost-effective, and simple to manage WLAN is required that enables healthcare professionals without causing undue distraction from their primary objective to provide high-quality patient care. The question then becomes, “how can WLANs provide these qualities for distributed healthcare organizations?”

Cloud Architecture

Network stability and availability is of primary importance for healthcare professionals relying on mobile devices to provide patient care. What’s more, this network stability must be provided in a cost-effective and simple to manage manner. Rather than relying on expensive wireless LAN controllers that are complex to manage and represent a large risk to the organization as a single point of failure, AirTight has developed a mature cloud architecture over the past 7 years that simplifies the network and is resilient to outages – the network continues to function even if cloud access is disrupted.

AirTight's datacenter locations

AirTight’s datacenter locations

Centralized Management

Distributed healthcare organizations have hundreds or thousands of locations that all require Wi-Fi access. With traditional Wi-Fi solutions, this represents a massive amount of effort to stage, configure, deploy, and manage each site individually. Even with centralized management, most Wi-Fi solutions still fail to effectively deliver simplified network management for a large number of locations.

AirTight solves this problem with hierarchical location-based administration. This allows administrators to configure one policy that is inherited across all locations. If a subset of locations require a deviation from the central policy, it is simple to override the inheritance for only the settings that deviate while still adopting the remainder of the policy. Inheritance and configuration policy can be applied at any level of the location hierarchy, thus providing both the simplified management of a large number of locations while allowing for variations.

Automatic and Reliable Security

The increase of digital information requires solutions that secure patient data and privacy. Most Wi-Fi security solutions focus solely on protecting only the infrastructure, require tedious manual configuration and tuning, and result in error-prone detection and alarming that swamp the user with false alerts.

hipaa

AirTight solves these challenges with integrated wireless intrusion prevention (WIPS) that secures both the infrastructure and mobile devices from attack. Our industry leading wireless intrusion prevention system addresses the physical and technical safeguards defined for protecting Electronic Protected Health Information (EPHI), preventing unauthorized wireless access to online medical records as well as securing the network from wireless security breaches. AirTight wireless security solutions stop wireless threats in their tracks, protect patient privacy and ease the IT burden for maintaining a robust wireless network. AirTight automatically detects, classifies, and remediates wireless threats to protect patient confidentiality, ensuring a robust wireless infrastructure that is performing well and meets HIPAA compliance. (See also our earlier post: Wi-Fi and HIPAA – A Tricky Combination).

Healthcare organizations require a WLAN that enables staff to provide high-quality patient care in a cost-effective, scalable, and highly secure manner. Be sure to visit the AirTight booth at HIMSS to find out more about our solutions for distributed healthcare.

Compliance, Healthcare, WiFi Access ,

Healthcare, Wi-Fi and HIPAA – A Tricky Combination

February 12th, 2014

What a great start to year on the industry events front – we started with NRF in January, looking forward to HIMSS and our ACTS event in February, and MURTEC in March. In NRF, high points of discussion were around Social Wi-Fi and analytics. That said, topics of security and PCI compliance were also high on the agenda prompted by the Target credit card breach that occurred just before NRF. I expect to there will be a lot of security discussions at HIMSS too.

Healthcare, Wi-Fi and HIPAA

The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) was passed by Congress in 1996. It is enforced by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), and implemented by regulations of 45 CFR. Among other provisions it has rules mandating that healthcare organizations safeguard the privacy and security of patient health information. These privacy rules apply to patient information in all forms and the security rules apply to patient information in electronic form called as Electronic Protected Health Information (EPHI). EPHI is any patient information transmitted over a network and stored on a computer.

HIPAA states privacy and security guidelines at high level. They do not require specific technology solutions, but are clear that reasonable and appropriate security measures must be implemented. For example, Section 164.312 has clauses requiring technical policies and procedures to allow access to EPHI only to authorized persons or software programs, to prevent improper alteration or destruction of EPHI and to protect health information transmitted over electronic communication network. Section 164.308 requires among other things identifying, responding, mitigating and documenting suspected or known security incidents.

AirTight WIPS

Protection from vulnerabilities for wireless access layer

What does all this mean to Wi-Fi? Today, healthcare is seeing a flood of wireless enabled devices in day to day operation.  Hospitals are increasingly providing Wi-Fi for doctors to access medical records and VoIP for staff communication. Healthcare facilities are increasingly using Wi-Fi-enabled medical devices. This makes Wi-Fi a dominant EPHI access layer in the healthcare environment. Hence, Wi-Fi security controls built into access points (APs) and covered by intrusion prevention system (WIPS) become relevant to satisfy HIPAA security rules as applied to the access to EPHI over Wi-Fi. For example, just as it is important to enforce strong authentication and encryption on managed APs and to control BYOD, it is important to ensure that unmanaged rogue APs do not open holes into healthcare networks that store and transmit EPHI or to ensure that doctors’ tablets do not connect to Evil Twins or neighborhood APs. Comprehensive reporting and forensic capabilities are also required to satisfy the auditing requirements of HIPAA.

How our customers are addressing security and compliance for EPHI

Over last many years, we have worked with several healthcare organizations to satisfy HIPAA requirements pertaining to Wi-Fi using AirTight’s overlay WIPS and using AirTight’s software configured access point/WIPS combos. Below are some examples.

  • Overlay WIPS in large hospital complex – Maine Medical Center (MMC) is 10-building, 68-floor, 2-million square feet healthcare complex in Portland, Maine. As an early adopter of Wi-Fi technology in healthcare information systems, the MMC has large deployment of Cisco WLC Wi-Fi. However, MMC is also security conscious and performed deep down analysis of security offered by various wireless security solutions. MMC chose to overlay AirTight WIPS on top of Cisco WLC.

AirTight has integration APIs for an easy overlay on Cisco WLC Wi-Fi. Moreover, AirTight WIPS comes out to be more cost efficient from both Capex (as it does not require controllers and MSE) and Opex perspective (due to freedom from false alarms and configuration overhead) than Cisco wireless security.

  • Access Points/WIPS for distributed clinics – CHS Health Services operates onsite clinics delivering full-service solutions for a broad spectrum of industries. Due to highly distributed nature, CHS is concerned about security as well as management of it Wi-Fi infrastructure. Faced with those challenges, AirTight cloud managed Wi-Fi which has WIPS built into it at no extra cost fit the bill. In addition, AirTight’s software configurable dual radio APs provide CHS the flexibility of choosing the right balance of access and security scanning radios to fit nature of each facility.

Overall, Wi-Fi can contribute greatly to enhance the quality of healthcare by providing easy access to information and mobility of healthcare staff. With Wi-Fi however comes risk of new and evolving security threats and compliance violations. As a result, choosing right security solution becomes imperative to be able to reap full benefits of Wi-Fi for the betterment of patient care! Visit AirTight booth at HIMSS to find out more.

Compliance, Healthcare, WiFi Access