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Posts Tagged ‘Soft AP’

Wi-Fi Insecurity Wrap-up for 2010

December 27th, 2010

The year 2010 witnessed continued growth in the enterprise WiFi deployments. The growth was fueled by the latest 802.11n revision to WiFi technology in the late 2009 and ready availability of WiFi in most consumer electronic devices launched in 2010, including the smart phones, printers, scanners, cameras, tablets, TVs, etc. The year 2010 also witnessed popularity of the specialized WiFi centric devices, such as MiFi.

However, the year 2010 also has some major WiFi security revelations/incidents in its kitty, which re-emphasize the continued need for adoption of the best practices for secure Wi-Fi deployment/usage. Here is the run-down on significant WiFi insecurity events which we witnessed in 2010:

  • Windows 7 virtual WiFi can turn a machine into a soft Rogue, which took Rogue AP thinking to a new level beyond the commercially available AP hardware.
  • Insecurity exposed due to MiFi like devices after the WiFi malfunction was experienced at two major trade shows in 2010 due to these devices – the first one was Google’s first public demo of Google TV and second was iPhone 4 launch at Apple Worldwide Developers Conference. Though this manifested as performance problem, it did show how easy it had become to set up personal HoneyPot AP or Hotspot AP on enterprise premises. Read more…

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Windows7 Virtual AP – Why is it a big deal now?

March 4th, 2010

Windows7 Virtual AP – Why is it a big deal now?Windows7 Virtual AP

Ever since WiFi radios were available, there have been open source and priced software that allowed users to convert their client cards into APs. While these were available only on Linux based operating systems to start with; ‘Soft AP’ drivers and software has been available for most operating systems for at least a few years now. Also available were USB devices that operate as an AP. In addition; the WiFi interface could always have been put into ad-hoc mode, allowing other clients to connect to it, effectively creating the same vulnerability as a soft AP

So, why is soft AP suddenly a big deal when Windows7 provides this as a built in option in the OS? Read more…

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